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CJimenez
02-10-2008, 12:27 AM
I need help correcting a flaw on my friends babys face. He has some serious eye goop in his eye and I wanted to know if anyone could help me get rid of that!

ride5000
02-10-2008, 08:01 AM
post up a link to a high res copy and we might be able to help determine the best action...

ken

iunno
02-10-2008, 10:23 AM
yeah, you should post the picture so we can determine what to do; clone stamp, healing brush, etc.

Stime187
02-10-2008, 11:50 AM
Moved to "Specific PP Requests".

CJimenez
02-10-2008, 07:07 PM
http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d156/pryncyzz/Gageonemonth043copy.jpg

For example..

ride5000
02-11-2008, 07:06 AM
i would use the healing brush. here is how i'd do it:

1) make a copy layer of the original image in photoshop by clicking ctrl-j.
2) with the second layer active, zoom in to his face.
3) select the heal brush.
4) the heal brush requires a "source" area from which it pulls texure information. pick a smooth part of his facial skin that looks like it would match the eye gook area/crease. hold down ALT and left click to define the source area.
5) part of the trick of the healing brush is to choose your brush size accordingly. a larger brush performs more of an "evening out effect" as it averages color/luminosity information over the brush area. a smaller brush has less "healing power" but more precise control. the smaller brush may also leave behind more of an effect from #7.
6) the other trick to using the healing brush is to learn when it does NOT work well. in my experience anything that has an intentional sharp luminosity gradient will look unnatural when "healed." this means any edges that are supposed to be there, or lines. you do NOT want to just target the corner of his eye with a big brush, for example, because it would leave a midtone circle behind instead of a corner.
7) because the heal brush repeatedly uses the same source pixels for texture information you want to keep moving the source around. don't use the same source for lots of different heals. don't pick a source area around something with sharp defined features/textures since they will be replicated in the destination. try to pick a source that has similar texture/tones as your intended target.
8) don't move your heal brush in the same direction every time--try to randomize your sweep motions. watch how far you're moving the mouse as you're healing since the source tracks the target as long as the brush is "brushing." you may move it off of a good source area.
9) once you've healed the region to your satisfaction, zoom back out to make sure it looks natural.
10) although you COULD skip this step, this is the one that really makes a difference IMHO: take the opacity of your heal layer and bring it down to zero. then slowly move it back up. you'll see an intermediate point at which your healing actually looks MORE natural/homogeneous/complete than it does at 100%. this is because your heal layer is being blended with the original layer instead of completely obliterating it. i usually see best results in the 40-60% range.
11) once you're happy with the outcome you can flatten the image and resave it as a jpg. give it a new name to preserve the original file though.

give it a shot and repost your results! :)

ken

QJ
02-11-2008, 11:45 AM
While the healing brush would be a good choice you can clone out an eye booger in about 2 seconds with the same result.

iunno
02-11-2008, 11:51 AM
i'd probably clone it out, but you can always try the healing brush.

in mexico, the word for eye booger is 'moo-koo'

:lol:

Stime187
02-11-2008, 11:58 AM
i would use the healing brush. here is how i'd do it:

1) make a copy layer of the original image in photoshop by clicking ctrl-j.
2) with the second layer active, zoom in to his face.
3) select the heal brush.
4) the heal brush requires a "source" area from which it pulls texure information. pick a smooth part of his facial skin that looks like it would match the eye gook area/crease. hold down ALT and left click to define the source area.
5) part of the trick of the healing brush is to choose your brush size accordingly. a larger brush performs more of an "evening out effect" as it averages color/luminosity information over the brush area. a smaller brush has less "healing power" but more precise control. the smaller brush may also leave behind more of an effect from #7.
6) the other trick to using the healing brush is to learn when it does NOT work well. in my experience anything that has an intentional sharp luminosity gradient will look unnatural when "healed." this means any edges that are supposed to be there, or lines. you do NOT want to just target the corner of his eye with a big brush, for example, because it would leave a midtone circle behind instead of a corner.
7) because the heal brush repeatedly uses the same source pixels for texture information you want to keep moving the source around. don't use the same source for lots of different heals. don't pick a source area around something with sharp defined features/textures since they will be replicated in the destination. try to pick a source that has similar texture/tones as your intended target.
8) don't move your heal brush in the same direction every time--try to randomize your sweep motions. watch how far you're moving the mouse as you're healing since the source tracks the target as long as the brush is "brushing." you may move it off of a good source area.
9) once you've healed the region to your satisfaction, zoom back out to make sure it looks natural.
10) although you COULD skip this step, this is the one that really makes a difference IMHO: take the opacity of your heal layer and bring it down to zero. then slowly move it back up. you'll see an intermediate point at which your healing actually looks MORE natural/homogeneous/complete than it does at 100%. this is because your heal layer is being blended with the original layer instead of completely obliterating it. i usually see best results in the 40-60% range.
11) once you're happy with the outcome you can flatten the image and resave it as a jpg. give it a new name to preserve the original file though.

give it a shot and repost your results! :)

ken

Ken,

Wow. I'm sure that would work great but that's a way overcomplicated manner of doing it in my opinion.

I'd just use the spot remover tool at a small brush size and knock it out.

ride5000
02-11-2008, 03:46 PM
you certainly could. ;) i just kinda went overboard on the walk through so that the process could be more widely applied to future, more substantial repairs.

the clone brush is just like the heal brush, but a little less "intelligent," so lots of the same caveats apply.

CJimenez
02-11-2008, 03:50 PM
i would use the healing brush. here is how i'd do it:

1) make a copy layer of the original image in photoshop by clicking ctrl-j.
2) with the second layer active, zoom in to his face.
3) select the heal brush.
4) the heal brush requires a "source" area from which it pulls texure information. pick a smooth part of his facial skin that looks like it would match the eye gook area/crease. hold down ALT and left click to define the source area.
5) part of the trick of the healing brush is to choose your brush size accordingly. a larger brush performs more of an "evening out effect" as it averages color/luminosity information over the brush area. a smaller brush has less "healing power" but more precise control. the smaller brush may also leave behind more of an effect from #7.
6) the other trick to using the healing brush is to learn when it does NOT work well. in my experience anything that has an intentional sharp luminosity gradient will look unnatural when "healed." this means any edges that are supposed to be there, or lines. you do NOT want to just target the corner of his eye with a big brush, for example, because it would leave a midtone circle behind instead of a corner.
7) because the heal brush repeatedly uses the same source pixels for texture information you want to keep moving the source around. don't use the same source for lots of different heals. don't pick a source area around something with sharp defined features/textures since they will be replicated in the destination. try to pick a source that has similar texture/tones as your intended target.
8) don't move your heal brush in the same direction every time--try to randomize your sweep motions. watch how far you're moving the mouse as you're healing since the source tracks the target as long as the brush is "brushing." you may move it off of a good source area.
9) once you've healed the region to your satisfaction, zoom back out to make sure it looks natural.
10) although you COULD skip this step, this is the one that really makes a difference IMHO: take the opacity of your heal layer and bring it down to zero. then slowly move it back up. you'll see an intermediate point at which your healing actually looks MORE natural/homogeneous/complete than it does at 100%. this is because your heal layer is being blended with the original layer instead of completely obliterating it. i usually see best results in the 40-60% range.
11) once you're happy with the outcome you can flatten the image and resave it as a jpg. give it a new name to preserve the original file though.

give it a shot and repost your results! :)

ken

wow THANKS A BUNCH!! YOU ROCK!