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s7khan
08-28-2009, 11:13 AM
With the 7D coming, there is a lot of talk between Full Frame and Crop sensors. Starting a year ago, I've only shot with a crop body (with the except of a few I took with Boob's 5Dmii). I never really knew the exact difference with the exception of the magnification factor and the larger sensor. I had a vague idea, but this page explained it well.

Mainly for the camera newbies who want to know what's the big deal with a FF body.


Click here (http://zachhodges.com/blog/important-camera-mysteries-made-really-simple-part-1/)

s7khan
08-28-2009, 11:22 AM
Or you can see here (didn't notice this when posting)

dmitchell
08-28-2009, 11:49 AM
Thanks Saad, It's a good read.

jacobsen1
08-28-2009, 12:05 PM
CNs:

full frame will always have less noise because the pixels are bigger
full frame has less "reach" unless it's got a crapload of pixels
full frame has the only wide fast lenses available, otherwise EVERYTHING you want is available in crop specific lenses these days
full frame gives you more natural vignetting (which can be added/removed via PP)
so far, full frame cameras have had sharper images due to the AA filters on average
DOF/FOV

ride5000
08-28-2009, 01:33 PM
there's a big one: ff has shallower DOF for the same FOV

Idjiit
08-28-2009, 03:18 PM
The DoF differences are the most practical difference unless you shoot a lot of high ISO. That can mean a sharper result despite AA differences since you can stop down into the lens' optimal sharpness range an still have the same DOF you'd have on a cropper. Whether it's good or bad really depends on what you shoot. Shallow DoF generally sucks if you're a macro or indoor sports shooter, for instance. Ideally you'd have both in your kit an use each where they work best.

s7khan
08-28-2009, 03:33 PM
From what I understand, crop is best for outdoorsy sport stuff. Where the 1.6x simply extends your reach, in bright conditions. FF is best for indoors due to larger pixels to reduce the affects of noise, and blur

Tylersladen
08-28-2009, 07:32 PM
From what I understand, crop is best for outdoorsy sport stuff. Where the 1.6x simply extends your reach, in bright conditions. FF is best for indoors due to larger pixels to reduce the affects of noise, and blur

I kinda feel the same.

Idjiit
08-28-2009, 11:35 PM
Again, those are not completely inaccurate generalizations but a lot of it depends on how you like to shoot. I love shooting FF outdoors since reach is not really an issue for me. I love being able to shoot at f/2.8 and still get nice separation from my background. Indoors, FF hurts me because I'm usually shooting wide open (even though I'm at ISO 6400) and so the DoF is really shallow. Really just have to try each for yourself and see how it works for ya.