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View Full Version : Hiding in the Shade. (questions from a redhead)


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Mrs.COS
06-07-2009, 11:14 PM
Ok, i tend to spend alot of my photography time out on the race track, be it rallyx, autox, mid ohio or 1/4 mile track or at picnics at the park. And i have some questions about exposure, and ISO while shooting during mid day.

I shoot with a Canon, if that helps to include any information.

I tend to hide in the shade on bright sunny days, because of my extreme love for my pastyness. And since most of this is shooting during the WORST part of the day as far as sunlight, (mid day sun, yay!) How do i set my camera up for optimal shooting?

Do i use lower ISO (1-200) 1/60 exposure? and put my white balance at shade because the camera is in shade? Or do i set the WB at sunny, because what i am shooting is in the sun?

GAH!!!

(I could totally be talking out of my butt here to, so please feel free to correct me)

Tylersladen
06-07-2009, 11:17 PM
set your camera to what your shooting and want exposed, If your shoot low iso and low shutter and don't trust your hand use a monopod/tripod it helps a lot.

Mrs.COS
06-07-2009, 11:21 PM
set your camera to what your shooting and want exposed, If your shoot low iso and low shutter and don't trust your hand use a monopod/tripod it helps a lot.

What if i didnt want to lug around a tripod? What type of settings should i use?

subimatt
06-07-2009, 11:23 PM
choose settings for your subject, adjust accordingly. If your shooting from the same spot with the same light, take a couple test photos, then drop the camera in manual.

Mrs.COS
06-07-2009, 11:28 PM
choose settings for your subject, adjust accordingly. If your shooting from the same spot with the same light, take a couple test photos, then drop the camera in manual.

I wish i was this brave.
I tend to sit in P or TV. Problem for me is, what i think looks good in the lcd, i come home and looks terrible.

its quite frustrating.

Todays images came out ok. Shot in P all day, and pics were hit or miss. Some where blown out and others are fine.

shooting today at a company picnic. (ill post up a few in a few mintues, so i can resize them a bit) just to give an idea of my problems..

subimatt
06-07-2009, 11:38 PM
Learn to read a histogram, depending on the camera checking exposure off of the lcd is not the best idea.

Tylersladen
06-08-2009, 12:14 AM
What if i didnt want to lug around a tripod? What type of settings should i use?

That shouldn't affect your settings, it just helps.
Monopods aren't really a pain to lug around.
I love my monofoto or w/e it is.

Markitos
06-08-2009, 12:25 AM
Why are we putting fast action shots and tripods in the same sentence again??

Mrs.COS
06-08-2009, 12:43 AM
argh, figure out what shots to work on!

Tylersladen
06-08-2009, 12:56 AM
Why are we putting fast action shots and tripods in the same sentence again??

he was shooting slow?
And I use my monopod for almost anything.

Markitos
06-08-2009, 01:03 AM
he was shooting slow?
And I use my monopod for almost anything.

She, and a monopod makes sense, a tripod does not--not for shooting action, anyway.

As far as setting up your camera for optimal exposure, it depends on what you're trying to do. 1) Optimal exposure in crap light is still not going to look great... good light is good light. 2) I would use Tv (shutter priority), and set a high shutter speed if you want to freeze action, a lower shutter speed if you want to pan/show some motion blur. 3) Use whatever ISO gets you the shutter speeds/apertures that you want. As Matt said, if the light is pretty consistent, you can set the aperture, ISO, and shutter speed that you want in M mode, and just leave it there.

In bright, direct sunlight you want to avoid blowing out your highlights, unless they're in the background and dont' matter that much. Learn to read your histogram, and then just get out there and shoot a bunch, experiment, and see what works and what doesn't.

LateApex
06-08-2009, 01:14 AM
Don't forget that your automatic modes are only doing what the meter tells it. So, choose the type of metering you need for the shot are taking, or dial in some compensation to adjust for it.

Basically, if the meter is trying to expose for the entire scene, it will often under/over expose the subject you are concerned with because it thinks you want everything exposed correctly, which is sometimes impossible.

Also, set your white balance for what's in the photo, not where you are. (Or shoot RAW :) )

jacobsen1
06-08-2009, 10:13 AM
expose for the subject.
auto WB.
RAWs help fix WB issues later if that's your issue.
Learn to read the historgram and make sure you don't clip either end (it's easier to read than a LCD in sunlight).

from there, post some sample files out of the camera and tell us what you don't like. ;)

Pedro
06-14-2009, 10:19 PM
I was bracketing exposure with comp at the autoX with high shutter speeds. it helped for the few that caught the sun while I was panning.

Mrs.COS
06-15-2009, 01:49 AM
Ill be posting up some pics here in the next week or so.. I am out of town in NYC visiting a friend. I have, of course, my camera with me.

:D Thanks for the input guys.

Also, do we have a good histogram tutorial anywhere?

I have googled them, and tehy are all so wordy, that i get a bit overwhelmed.

MK19
06-15-2009, 12:39 PM
Paging nate49509

cdvma
06-15-2009, 01:16 PM
Also, do we have a good histogram tutorial anywhere?

I've liked these ones

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/histograms1.htm
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/histograms2.htm