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JERM
03-03-2009, 01:53 PM
Using The High Pass Filter For Sharpening
There's a sharpening technique that's really gaining popularity that works especially well on images with lots of well-defined edges (such as buildings, cars, furniture, etc.). It's actually a layer technique combined with a filter, but it's very easy (and often very effective) to apply. Start by duplicating the Background layer of the image you want to sharpen by pressing Command-J (PC: Control-J). Then, go under the Filter menu, under Other, and choose High Pass. When the High Pass dialog appears, enter a Radius of 1.5 pixels (a good starting point) and click OK to apply the filter. It will change your image into a gray mess, but don't sweat it (yet). To bring the sharpening into your image, change the blend mode of this layer to Soft Light. The gray will disappear, and the edges of your image will appear sharper. You can also try the Hard Light mode to increase the sharpening effect. Still not enough? Make a copy of the layer for a multiplying effect. Is one copy not enough sharpening, but two are too much? You can control the sharpening amount in two ways: (1) Switch between Soft Light and Hard Light, or (2) lower the Opacity setting of the layer to dial in just the right amount of sharpening.



Sharpening Your Images Like A Pro
Just about every image that is brought into Photoshop, whether from a scanner, digital camera, CD-ROM, etc., needs to be sharpened. The undisputed tool for this task is Photoshop's Unsharp Mask filter. The only downside of using this filter is that getting the level of sharpening you'd like can sometimes cause color shifts and halos, and it can also accentuate dust or specs within the image. There are two ways around this, and what's great about these methods is they let you apply a higher level of sharpening without causing color shifts or other problems: (1) Convert your file from RGB mode to Lab Color. Then go to the Channels palette and click on the Lightness channel. Now apply the Unsharp Mask filter (twice if you need it), then switch back to RGB mode (don't worry, there's no harm in this RGB-to-Lab-to-RGB mode conversion). (2) If you're working on a CMYK image, apply the Unsharp Mask filter, then go under the Edit menu and choose Fade Unsharp Mask. When the Fade dialog appears, change the Mode pop-up menu to Luminosity and click OK (which pretty much does the same thing as method 1; it applies the sharpening to the luminance of the image, not the color).

riderofbmx4130
03-03-2009, 02:12 PM
hmmm i'll have to try these methods.
if only my computer didn't suck and let me run PS easily ::)

jjswee
03-03-2009, 06:08 PM
Thanks! I was looking for a different way to sharpen.

I also read somewhere that 'smart sharpen' was better than unsharp mask. Why is it called unsharp mask btw?

Redlineracer12
03-03-2009, 09:54 PM
I have used the high pass filter with success before :) Also, you can delete sections of the "sharpened layer" if you don't want the sharpening to apply there. Like in the background/shadow areas of a noisy image.

Tylersladen
03-03-2009, 09:59 PM
hmmm i'll have to try these methods.
if only my computer didn't suck and let me run PS easily ::)


a half deccent computer josh runs for like 400 now a days

Jayso
03-03-2009, 10:36 PM
Hm, i created actions for all the methods above, interestingly enough, i cant seem to find a picture that isnt sharp enough already :)

JERM
03-03-2009, 10:43 PM
:lol: That's because you're a Pro... it says so under your name.

shelloflight
03-03-2009, 10:44 PM
Thanks! I was looking for a different way to sharpen.

I also read somewhere that 'smart sharpen' was better than unsharp mask. Why is it called unsharp mask btw?

because it masks the unsharpness (not a word?) of the photo. covers it up so to speak.

that's my understanding. could very well be flawed.

Zillon
03-03-2009, 10:47 PM
Hm, i created actions for all the methods above, interestingly enough, i cant seem to find a picture that isnt sharp enough already :)

Even after a resize? Now that's a problem I'd love to have.

I've used USM and SS in the past, but I just now experimented with high-pass for the first time. I'm going to have to play with this one. :cool:

Markitos
03-03-2009, 10:48 PM
Why is it called unsharp mask btw?

Because back in the old film days of yore, you placed a slightly unsharp positive mask over the negative, then made your print. It increases the acutance of the negative, making it appear sharper.

Wiki article on unsharp mask (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unsharp_mask)

A lot of the techniques in Photoshop and LR are ports from the darkroom. The more things change, the more they stay the same.

Jayso
03-03-2009, 10:49 PM
Even after a resize? Now that's a problem I'd love to have.

I've used USM and SS in the past, but I just now experimented with high-pass for the first time. I'm going to have to play with this one. :cool:

I usually don't re-size my images unless they go on flickr. But even the images post re-size look ok to me.

riderofbmx4130
03-04-2009, 09:27 PM
a half deccent computer josh runs for like 400 now a days
i'd rather not have a "half decent" anything for a computer.
give me your MAC, you got it fo free anyways.

jjswee
03-05-2009, 12:09 AM
my 'half decent' sub-$500 computer is a new dell with 4 processors and 4 gigs of ram... :lol:

riderofbmx4130
03-05-2009, 12:08 PM
so i tested out the second sharpening tip!
my results:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3661/3331298942_2e494e900f.jpg?v=0
definitely sharper, i'm pretty happy with it

thomps6s
03-05-2009, 12:24 PM
so i tested out the second sharpening tip!
my results:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3661/3331298942_2e494e900f.jpg?v=0
definitely sharper, i'm pretty happy with it

Can you post a 100% crop including the rooster's head?

JERM
03-05-2009, 12:27 PM
And a 100% crop of the original?

riderofbmx4130
03-05-2009, 12:28 PM
i'll get right on it

riderofbmx4130
03-05-2009, 12:41 PM
original:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v689/riderofbmx4130/2009088.jpg

100%crop of original:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v689/riderofbmx4130/2009088copyorig100crop.jpg

sharpened copy, only sharpened nothing else:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3661/3331298942_2e494e900f_b.jpg

100%crop of edited:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v689/riderofbmx4130/2009088copyorig100crop.jpg

ride5000
03-05-2009, 12:56 PM
i really dislike sharpening as a rule and only do it selectively when i have to.

fwiw
ken

frigidlight
09-04-2011, 12:49 PM
bump from the past because I'm starting to look into sharpening for my web images. what kind of values for unsharp mask and fade unsharp mask are you guys using? leaving it on default seems ok, but i've seen some other tutorials online that suggested 300% and 200% and a 50% fade...this produced a terribly unrealistic image.

secondly, should I be downsizing before I sharpen?

MoLS
09-06-2011, 12:39 AM
I resize and then sharpen using smart sharpen. I start with 0.4 pixel radius and 35% and tweak from there.

jacobsen1
09-06-2011, 12:39 PM
find my thread in the school house with the borders Dave. It INCLUDES a DL of my action and my sharpening is built into the action.

CNs though, I sharpen with USM at 100/1/0 (I think?) then size to 1500 on the long size, then "sharpen" and then size to my web res and I'm done. All my lenses are sharp copies. ;)

JD
09-07-2011, 08:28 PM
Is there a rough correlation for the amount of sharpening between PS and Lightroom? I find myself doing the sharpening in PS more often than I should.

jacobsen1
09-07-2011, 08:31 PM
I've yet to find one.

JD
09-07-2011, 08:37 PM
Thanks for the quick follow-up. I'm having a hard time sorting out the finer details of the PP for the 5DII. But it's an OK problem...