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subimatt
02-27-2009, 08:15 AM
Same basic rules apply from my Engagement shoot thread. (http://www.newschoolofphotography.com/forum/showthread.php?t=13645)

These are a bit easier in that, your dealing with a single subject who generally is comfortable around the camera. From a photographer stand point, this allows you to concentrate on your end, the lighting, scenery, ect and let the model do the posing. Generally speaking a model should know his/her GOOD angles. Not always the case, but for the most part it should make your job a bit easier.

As always, Lighting > Background
Look for both!

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3203/2837919060_39fa1034dc_o.jpg

My general style for these shoots, is choosing a general location and usually do a walking route around the area. I look for both lighting and color contrasts compared to the models attire.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2131/2430485996_fc76d7cc76_o.jpg

Once youve found your perfect little spot, search within there to find a couple areas where you feel the photos can work. Remember what the subject is, the model. NOT the scenery. Background plays an important role, but its not meant to distract or take away from your subject, its supposed to support and make your subject POP.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2309/2430486332_1bf2de8c4a_o.jpg

I use wide apertures for the most part, I rarely go above f4 but thats personal preference. As far as your shooting goes, Do what works for you. Shooting wide open has benefits as well as disadvantages. Focus points wide open or 2.8 and faster are crucial as you can loose the whole photograph.

Part 2 with focus, Whats the focus point... well your the photographer, you decide on that. As far as portraits go, the focus point should be on the subjects eyes 100% of the time IMO.


What happens if you get stuck with harsh sun?
well... use it! Not all direct sun is bad and can be very useful, you can get a very natural rim light around the hair of the subject and it can give them that extra pop! Watch your histogram and your meter or you could wind up way left or way right.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3050/2955458333_47e63095ed_o.jpg

And remember, practice is the best way to learn...
some more samples, Ask Qs as always, im sure im forgetting something.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2054/2307452731_730425b959_o.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2387/2307454409_7da4f51985_o.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3072/2430489188_3a39803515_o.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2205/2429675015_b9d0441f3d_o.jpg

s7khan
02-27-2009, 08:51 AM
Thanks for the tutorial Matt

subimatt
02-27-2009, 08:55 AM
seriously, ask questions if you have any, I know im missing stuff but had to run to work.

s7khan
02-27-2009, 08:59 AM
I plan to. Just that I'm in class right now and just went through the entire tutorial in a minute.

CaityB
02-27-2009, 09:04 AM
How do you meter in harsh light? What metering setting? (I'm not familiar with these, because I'm an idiot....I'm referring to partial metering, etc... [()] looks like that?)

I'm putting myself out here to look like an idiot because I haven't looked at the capabilities of different metering types. :(

s7khan
02-27-2009, 09:06 AM
I'm putting myself out here to look like an idiot


Must.resist.temptation



Seriously though, the light you capture looks perfect every time. Is it a lot of PP or do you pay a lot of attention with the light during the shoot?

tbert
02-27-2009, 09:09 AM
seriously, ask questions if you have any, I know im missing stuff but had to run to work.
Do you have any nudes of the chick in the last pic? :devil:


What? You said ask...:whatever:

CaityB
02-27-2009, 09:11 AM
Must.resist.temptation



Seriously though, the light you capture looks perfect every time. Is it a lot of PP or do you pay a lot of attention with the light during the shoot?


That reminds me, I need to figure out how to either calibrate my Rebel screen or calibrate (which is a given) my computer monitor. My Rebel shows up a LOT brighter than my monitors...it's hard to gauge without looking at the histogram. When I actually look at it, I try to get that archish looking thing, but sometimes that doesn't happen. I need to learn more about lighting, period :unamused:

tbert
02-27-2009, 09:15 AM
That reminds me, I need to figure out how to either calibrate my Rebel screen or calibrate (which is a given) my computer monitor. My Rebel shows up a LOT brighter than my monitors...it's hard to gauge without looking at the histogram. When I actually look at it, I try to get that archish looking thing, but sometimes that doesn't happen. I need to learn more about lighting, period :unamused:

:huh::huh::huh:

ride5000
02-27-2009, 09:19 AM
just turn down the LCD brightness on the camera.

ride5000
02-27-2009, 09:27 AM
as far as metering goes, i always use partial, and always in the center.

this is because i almost never shoot in anything but manual mode. so my process is:
1) point center at subject
2) check meter
3) adjust aperture/shutter/iso as needed
4) focus using rear *
5) recompose as needed
6) shoot

once i've dialled in 1, 2, 3, then i rarely have to revisit those steps unless there is a huge change in illumination.

i use the center af point almost exclusively because both my heavily-used lenses are f/2.8, which allows the 20d to use a high precision cross-type af sensor (said to be ~3x more accurate than the non high precision) which is only active on f/2.8 and faster lenses.

even if you're using a body without a high precision af sensor, the center af point is usually the only one that's a cross-type, meaning it uses both x and y axes to determine best focus.

i despise the auto focus point selection and never use it. if the 20d had a spot meter mode i'd use that to meter for my subject, but it doesn't.

that's my process, but remember it's up to you to find what works best. this method would not work very well at all for sports shooting on a partially shady field, for example.

CaityB
02-27-2009, 09:32 AM
just turn down the LCD brightness on the camera.

: picard:

tbert, I love your input! :lol:


Thanks Ken!

subimatt
02-27-2009, 09:57 AM
Never gauge exposure off the camera LCD, Check the histogram to check exposure. I go between partial and spot metering. Always use center AF point and recompose.

thomps6s
02-27-2009, 10:32 AM
Always use center AF point and recompose.

Interesting. I would not have guessed this.

subimatt
02-27-2009, 10:37 AM
Interesting. I would not have guessed this.

whys that? just curious.

thomps6s
02-27-2009, 10:41 AM
Not sure, i just figured you would take advantage of the AF points. Are you shooting manual?
Also, working at Wide Open apertures I would expect to miss the focus by focusing and re-composing, but maybe not if the subjects are far enough away?

subimatt
02-27-2009, 10:44 AM
Not sure, i just figured you would take advantage of the AF points. Are you shooting manual?
Also, working at Wide Open apertures I would expect to miss the focus by focusing and re-composing, but maybe not if the subjects are far enough away?

95% Id say I shoot in av. the rest in M.
never had issue with focus and recompose even wide open. I just do it that way since its much faster. Weddings alot of times you need to get the shot, no time to play with the controller device to get side points. Back button focus and shutter AE lock is how I have all my cameras setup.

CaityB
02-27-2009, 10:44 AM
Always use center AF point and recompose.

Whyssat?

subimatt
02-27-2009, 10:47 AM
Whyssat?

I choose the af point my camera uses, the center one. I focus with that point, then recompose my shot before taking it.

Angelo
02-27-2009, 11:17 AM
Back button focus and shutter AE lock is how I have all my cameras setup.

Hmm, interesting. I can see why you (and Ken) would want this setup. I've always just used the default settings.

I wonder how that affects using a remote shutter release (i.e., will half-press engage AF lock, or AE lock)? I'm going to check right now.

EDIT: Bummer. It engages AE lock, not AF.


-A

ride5000
02-27-2009, 11:35 AM
again, iirc, in all the xxd series canons, there's only one high precision cross type, and that's the middle. if you've got 2.8 lenses or faster, that's a REALLY good reason to use only that point. the 40d for example has 9 cross type, 1 HP cross type (center).

i BELIEVE the 5ds both have the same setup: 1 cross in th center which is hp.

it's only when you get to the 1 series that you have multiple high precision cross type sensors.

i also believe that the rebels do not have any high precision sensors, but the only cross type is the center.



fwiw
ken

subimatt
02-27-2009, 04:25 PM
How do you meter in harsh light? What metering setting? (I'm not familiar with these, because I'm an idiot....I'm referring to partial metering, etc... [()] looks like that?)

I'm putting myself out here to look like an idiot because I haven't looked at the capabilities of different metering types. :(

Ill sometimes go to spot, meter the face, test shoot, check histogram and adjust from there. Im fairly comfortable being able to judge the exposure why watching the shutter speeds vary. This is all just the way I shoot however.

subimatt
02-27-2009, 04:26 PM
again, iirc, in all the xxd series canons, there's only one high precision cross type, and that's the middle. if you've got 2.8 lenses or faster, that's a REALLY good reason to use only that point. the 40d for example has 9 cross type, 1 HP cross type (center).

i BELIEVE the 5ds both have the same setup: 1 cross in th center which is hp.

it's only when you get to the 1 series that you have multiple high precision cross type sensors.

i also believe that the rebels do not have any high precision sensors, but the only cross type is the center.



fwiw
ken

another reason why I use center point, it is the most accurate in my cameras and helps when shooting with a minimal dof.

edgephoto
02-28-2009, 05:28 PM
yeah I personally use the center AF point exclusively as well. focus and recompose. if I am shooting static portraits (subject is posed and not moving) with a zoom lens, I will often zoom all the way in on the subject's face, AF, then zoom back out and compose. this also allows you to see which way the meter moves when your framing goes really close in (if you're shooting in manual mode).

if anyone doesn't understand what I mean by that, I can explain...

subimatt
03-03-2009, 02:41 PM
I should add that if anyone is in the area and would like to shoot with me at some point, let me know.

thomps6s
05-04-2009, 09:49 AM
I was soo off my game yesterday while shooting my friend's son's 3 year pics. I started wanting to light him with the softbox but he got tired of it right away which sucks because I was making some nice light. So I decided to just follow him around and snap away, I was switching between spot metering, evaluative, AV and manual and was just borking everything. The light was harsh and I couldn't get anything right. I am thoroughly disappointed in the images and in myself.

s7khan
05-04-2009, 10:08 AM
WHo comes up with the poses? The model, you or a collaboration? While I think I can take decent pictures, it's guiding the model that I'm uncertain aboot

CaityB
05-04-2009, 10:10 AM
It's really nice when the model naturally poses, hopefully you'll see this next week :) There are tons of diff models we'll be working with and I'm hoping at least a few of them are natural at it.

Some you have to pose, and even the ones that know how to pose you have to tweak (life if an arm is in the way of lighting and whatnot because they are thinking poses not lighting like us) :)

thomps6s
05-04-2009, 10:28 AM
I guess based off my frustrations response above Caitlyn's, the question i wanted to ask is "Do you look for open shade, preferably?"

subimatt
05-04-2009, 10:31 AM
I always looks for open shade to shoot in, and if there is none, subjects back to the sun. but you might get some flare :wave:

Harsh lighting shawn, Im always on spot metering with AV, most times ill get a good meter, then over to manual it goes.

CaityB
05-04-2009, 10:40 AM
I guess based off my frustrations response above Caitlyn's, the question i wanted to ask is "Do you look for open shade, preferably?"


oopsy! Didn't meant o bury ya!

ride5000
05-04-2009, 10:44 AM
I am thoroughly disappointed in the images and in myself.

you should be. you suck.


;)

subimatt
05-04-2009, 10:45 AM
WHo comes up with the poses? The model, you or a collaboration? While I think I can take decent pictures, it's guiding the model that I'm uncertain aboot


Depends, I prefer to let the models do the posing, If I need to add some direction I will. It depends on the purpose of the shoot.

carsnrockmusic
05-04-2009, 01:14 PM
For fill lighting...flash bracket? remote flashes? camera mounted with fancy diffuser? Does this mostly depend on the natural lighting conditions/style of shot you are trying to compose?

I need to practice using spot/partial metering one of these days now that I've got my blingy 85L. Does it make a world of difference mastering these? Is it mostly visible when pixel peeping/full res?

I've got a few good looking lady friends that are all up for letting me use them for practice....pictures that is. I figure before I make the move to get them out I can practice on my stuffed penguin that came with the Madagascar 2 dvd.


/annoying noob questions

...for now :)

subimatt
05-04-2009, 01:23 PM
I want a stuffed Skipper!

subimatt
05-04-2009, 01:25 PM
Anyway, Well the metering mode depends on the shooting conditions. Spots going to give you a more precise exposure on what you are metering, its especially helpful in bright sun or large areas of light/ dark where its easier to be thrown. I always shoot natural light, I dont like the fill flash work, although it has its place. It really depends on your shooting style/ look your are looking to obtain.

carsnrockmusic
05-04-2009, 01:48 PM
I also prefer natural light....well I guess that goes without saying (85 1.2)

Look for penguin in critique section in the future. Thanks for the pointers! :)

VicRSTi
05-04-2009, 07:42 PM
Do you have any input on when/how you use your flash for these type of shots? Did you use any fill flash for your harsh sunlight shot?

subimatt
05-04-2009, 08:30 PM
Do you have any input on when/how you use your flash for these type of shots? Did you use any fill flash for your harsh sunlight shot?


Nope, no flash. I rarely use them at weddings. Not a fan of the look.

thomps6s
05-07-2009, 02:52 PM
I read everywhere to shoot Outdoor Portraits at "Wide open" apertures. Why is this? If it is Sunny and there is enough light, why not stop down for extra DOF?

jacobsen1
05-07-2009, 02:53 PM
backgrounds are distracting? Plus, faster shutters are good for freezing action (people/kids moving) and avoiding lens/camera shake?

but yeah, I wouldn't always shoot at 1.2 just because I had it or anything.... ;)

subimatt
05-07-2009, 03:21 PM
Most likely for the background distraction, or the extra subject pop. I like the look on the images which is why I shoot wide open.

subimatt
05-07-2009, 03:25 PM
but yeah, I wouldn't always shoot at 1.2 just because I had it or anything.... ;)

:wave:

dmitchell
05-07-2009, 03:35 PM
So what's your preferred len(s)? (on a crop body) Looking at exif these range from 35mm to 80mm.

subimatt
05-07-2009, 03:38 PM
On the crop and on the 5d I use 50mm alot. 85 more on the 5d, but still use the 50 primarily.

Depends in the shoot, location, and effect Im going for in the photo. But if I only had to take one lens with me on these shoots, it would be a 50mm.

jacobsen1
05-07-2009, 06:44 PM
On the crop and on the 5d I use 50L, well because it's the 50L... :$$$:


fixed.












:keke:

subimatt
05-07-2009, 07:16 PM
:wave:

danm
06-25-2009, 08:12 AM
Matt, do you have any go to location types? as in do you prefer walls/architecture/buildings as backgrounds? or semi shady wooded/park areas?

do you have any suggestions for the type of location that a newb could look for to increase the likelihood of location success?

Markitos
06-25-2009, 08:13 AM
He definitely likes "shady" locations...





sorry, back on topic.

thomps6s
06-25-2009, 08:17 AM
Matt, do you have any go to location types? as in do you prefer walls/architecture/buildings as backgrounds? or semi shady wooded/park areas?

do you have any suggestions for the type of location that a newb could look for to increase the likelihood of location success?

I know you asked Matt, but I look for anything with background interest whether it is a park with nice plants/flowers/bushes or Brick walls, industrial, or solid color backgrounds and if shooting in daylight I try to find open shade areas. Areas that are still getting light, but it is even lighting. Think of the light in between two tall buildings during the day, there is light in there, it is even and it isn't bright/harsh.

danm
06-25-2009, 09:12 AM
thanks duder! the brickwall is my first idea too. i want to try this out with my ringflash and the back of my house with my wife if she will allow it.

i like your other suggestions too, i will be looking for these.


Matt, anything to add?

subimatt
06-25-2009, 06:22 PM
Nice light is #1, #2 is colors/ background.

I generally blow out backgrounds so I try to focus on colors vs the backgrounds. Light outfit/ dark bg ect.

nuklehead
06-26-2009, 06:13 PM
I need more help on the "Back button focus" ... I'm not getting it.

The last shoot I adjusted my focal pt so it was on the baby (in the basket) but the focus was on the baskets edge and the baby was soft ... was that bcz it front focused or bcz I shoot wide open? (I can provide example shot if needed).

subimatt
06-26-2009, 09:19 PM
were you using the center focal point?

nuklehead
06-26-2009, 09:31 PM
no, and that may be my problem.
I'm moving the the selective focus point to one of the outside points ususally. This thread is the 1st I've read telling me to stick to the center...I'll practicing doing that for sure!

Hotrodguru
06-30-2009, 04:19 PM
This is an excellent write-up Matt. Wish I had found this a long time ago. Some excellent tips and points here.

:)

MK19
06-30-2009, 04:27 PM
Thanks for bumping this Jay. Now that I am beginning to take more photos of people and hope to get some one-on-one with some models, this write-up is choice material!!! Thanks matt!!! *smooch*

subimatt
06-30-2009, 04:29 PM
your welcome! :) I should prob add some moar samples at some point.

nuklehead
06-30-2009, 04:33 PM
as far as metering goes, i always use partial, and always in the center.

this is because i almost never shoot in anything but manual mode. so my process is:
1) point center at subject
2) check meter
3) adjust aperture/shutter/iso as needed
4) focus using rear *
5) recompose as needed
6) shoot


Help me with #4 pleaseeee ... I cant find anything in the info I have for rear focus. (40d)

subimatt
06-30-2009, 04:35 PM
^ Its a custom function. If you have a 40D, you can use the AF on button. Otherwise is Cn Fn 4, option 2 enabled to switch the af on to the *

MK19
06-30-2009, 04:39 PM
^ Its a custom function. If you have a 40D, you can use the AF on button. Otherwise is Cn Fn 4, option 2 enabled to switch the af on to the *

Nikon. > Canon uber multi-pass l33t speak

nuklehead
06-30-2009, 04:42 PM
thanks Matt!

subimatt
06-30-2009, 05:03 PM
Nikon. > Canon uber multi-pass l33t speak


oh dont get me started on nikons million button menus.

BobbyT
06-30-2009, 05:31 PM
Help me with #4 pleaseeee ... I cant find anything in the info I have for rear focus. (40d)


^ Its a custom function. If you have a 40D, you can use the AF on button. Otherwise is Cn Fn 4, option 2 enabled to switch the af on to the *
This is the only way to go for your focus button.

thomps6s
06-30-2009, 05:33 PM
Why use the *? I always half press the shutter.

BobbyT
06-30-2009, 05:44 PM
Why use the *? I always half press the shutter.
I have a couple of reasons.
1 focus can be locked and you can take your hand of the button, re compose, etc. The shutter button only meters at half press.
and
2 I leave the camera in ai servo all the time. If I need to grab the camera fast to catch the kids in action, the focus is ready. I can press the * once and let go for single focus.
and last
it feels more natural to me

thomps6s
06-30-2009, 06:01 PM
I have a couple of reasons.
1 focus can be locked and you can take your hand of the button, re compose, etc. The shutter button only meters at half press.
and
2 I leave the camera in ai servo all the time. If I need to grab the camera fast to catch the kids in action, the focus is ready. I can press the * once and let go for single focus.
and last
it feels more natural to me

Oooooh, that is nice. I had no idea. Thanks!

BobbyT
06-30-2009, 06:31 PM
Glad I could be of help.

Markitos
06-30-2009, 07:11 PM
Yeah, I finally switched to the back button, too... It takes a little bit to get used to, so don't do it before anything critical... but now I really prefer it.

danm
06-30-2009, 09:24 PM
i use alot of * button for metering when i am spot metering so that is it locked in as i recompose. i have done a little of the focus with AF-ON, but not as much as the metering lock

nuklehead
06-30-2009, 10:02 PM
ok, so I've been trying and I got it in AI Focus but doesnt seem to lock in AI Servo ... any ideas? (canon 40d)

subimatt
06-30-2009, 10:04 PM
AI servo will never "lock" focus, the whole point is to be able to adjust the focal point on a moving subject. Good for tracking and panning ect. My camera never leaves AI Servo.

nuklehead
06-30-2009, 10:31 PM
ok, I'll keep practicing until I get used to it ... thanks!

BobbyT
07-01-2009, 04:54 AM
AI servo will never "lock" focus, the whole point is to be able to adjust the focal point on a moving subject. Good for tracking and panning ect. My camera never leaves AI Servo.
Especially when your little one becomes mobile.

twizhimself
08-05-2009, 08:13 PM
i have officially inspired by your shots sir! (as stated in your other thread)

unamused
01-07-2010, 04:11 PM
interesting... ive read things about it being bad to focus recompose when shooting wide open but you say youve never had any issues?

hmmm ive been messing around with choosing different focus points and it can be a pain when shooting vertically.